How does inCoris TZI compare to e.max CAD?

Alwyn Naraine, CDT · November 20, 2011

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    Dan O'Rourke, CDT The reason they prescribe it.........because they haven't figured out how to make steel look white. When they do that will be the next best thing!! I call all of this the dark side of dentistry!!!! I am very aware that I am on a very small island, but I hope there are more of you out there who share my commitment to what is best for the patient.

    November 21, 2011
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    Alwyn Naraine, CDT Dan, the day they figure how to make steel esthetic we are going to be iron workers, and dentistry will be back in the iron age.

    November 21, 2011
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    Curt Morgese, CDT Some one please tell me why when gold was reasonable in price every dentist I talked to would agree that gold was the BEST material for second molars. Mostly due to its soft properties in a place that took the brunt of the biting force ie...first point of contact in most cases. Why have we done a 180 degree flip??

    November 21, 2011
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    Jim Thacker Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is that most of the monolithic materials (i.e. lithium disilicate and full contour zirconia) wear about the same against opposing teeth when glazed. We caution our dentists not to "grind in" occlusion exposing these abrasive materials to opposing teeth. I still agree with the idea that cast gold is a great restoration when esthetics are of secondary importance...See more

    November 23, 2011
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    Alwyn Naraine, CDT Jim, you are kind of correct, full contour Zr. shows zero wear when glazed against natural dentition compared to lithium disilicate which wears at the same rate as natural teeth.

    November 30, 2011
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    Dan O'Rourke, CDT I would like as many technicians as possible to witness there work being placed in the dentist office. If you have never experienced this you will soon see that almost all crowns are adjusted in the mouth. This does not mean you didn't do the best you could, it's just that there are so many variables that go into getting the perfect occlusion. Many of which are out of your control. So if we ask the...See more

    November 30, 2011
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    Margot Louw Dan, then I guess there is no fool proof way to construct a crown out of the bite? Had a case this week with a full metal crown and knowing the dentist always complains that the crown is in the bite/too high, I made double sure that the crown is not too high (1st time I'm doing work for her). I took the thickest articulation paper we have and folded it double to make sure the crown is out of the...See more

    November 30, 2011
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    Alwyn Naraine, CDT I would have to say it all starts with the dentist. The more information you receive the more predictable the outcome will be. I happen to have the luxury to witness every restoration being loaded, I know this is not so for most of the Technicians out there.
    "Spot grinding" or "selective grinding" is acceptable in my view for a dentist to do, when they have to grind off lets say an entire triangular...See more

    November 30, 2011
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    Dan O'Rourke, CDT As I said Margot, so many factors to think about. To identify a few, a stone model is static and the oral cavity is dynamic. You have movement in the periodontal ligament, how much? it's different for everyone. Another important piece is the temporary if it is made out of occlusion you can bet your crown will be high from the opposing tooth drifting. Or if the temporary's interproximals are not in...See more

    November 30, 2011
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    Margot Louw We should actually be called dental magicians and not technicians!!

    November 30, 2011
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    Mark Jackson, RDT If you are looking for the perfect restorative material, you can forget Gods own product. Human tooth enamel can chip, break and fracture. Tooth enamel will wear opposing teeth (just look at mine). Corrosion resistant? Nope, decays like crazy. Soluablity? Fails. We have a quiver of materials at our disposal, and no one material is perfect for every job, but MONOLITHIC restorations have killed the PFM...See more

    May 8, 2012
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